FAQ

What is Qi?
 
What is acupuncture?                                   
                                                         
 
 
 
 
 

 

What is Qi?

Qi pronounced as “chee”,  is the substance of life. As the basis of the universe’s infinite manifestations, Qi is present in all life forms. Pathways of Qi run throughout the body and are known as meridians or channels. Qi flows within the channels to supplies life and energy to every cell and organ in human body. When systemic Qi flow is blocked, disharmony is crested and imbalances is arise which cause disorders.
 
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Acupuncture is a therapy developed more that 2000 years ago in Asia. It consists of stimulating specific anatomic points in the body by the insertion of needles into the skin for therapeutic purpose. These points are gateways to stimulate and activate the body’s self-healing mechanisms. It is a part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) which also includes the application of heat, acupressure, friction, suction, impulses of electromagnetic energy, and herbal medicine.
 
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How does acupuncture work?

 

The basic idea behind acupuncture, according to ancient theory, is that energy flows within the human body and can be stimulated to create balance and health. The energy flow or vital force i.e. Qi moves throughout the body along 12 main channels known as meridians. These meridians represent the major organs and functions of the body although they do not follow the exact pathways of nerves or blood flow. The goal of acupuncture is to correct imbalances of flow and restore health through stimulation, generally by inserting needles through the skin at points alone the meridians of the body. Current acupuncture information lists up to 400 different acupuncture points for various health problems. Scientists have attempted to explain the actual physical effects of acupuncture on the human body. Some researchers suggest that pain relief happens when acupuncture needles stimulate nerves. Another well accepted theory is that acupuncture releases pain-relieving chemicals, such as endorphins and serotonin.  Acupuncture may also be effective because it targets painful tender points, sometimes called trigger points.  Additionally, acupuncture may decrease pain-causing inflammation by stimulating the body’s pituitary gland to release cortisol, a hormone that is known to reduce inflammation. Although the exact manner in which acupuncture works is unknown, the treatment appears helpful for certain medical illnesses in certain people at certain times.
 
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Does acupuncture hurt?

 

The vast majority of patients do not consider acupuncture a painful procedure. Some patients may experience a vague numbness, heaviness, tingling, or dull ache when the needle is inserted, most feel nothing at all. Sometimes people experience “Qi sensation” which is a sensation of energy spreading and moving around the needle. All these reactions are good signs indicating favorable results from the acupuncture treatment. Some acupuncture points are totally painless in most of the patients; however some points can be sensitive. Women are usually more sensitive to needling when about to start their menstruation or during their menstruation. After treatment, you may feel energized or may experience a deep sense of relaxation and well being.
 
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Acupuncture is extremely safe. It is an all-natural, drug free therapy, with no side effects except minor complains ranging from bruising to needle pain and lasting less than a week with no serious adverse effects. There is little or no danger of infection from acupuncture needles because they are disposable needles which are sterile and one-time use. According to the 1997 Consensus Statement on Acupuncture, the NIH (National Institutes of Health) reported, "One of the advantages of acupuncture is that the incidence of adverse effects is substantially lower than that of many drugs or other accepted medical procedures used for the same conditions."
 
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The number of treatments varies from individuals and also depend on the nature of your problems and how your body responds to the treatment. This is a very difficult question to give a straight answer to. In Chinese Medicine, we speak in terms of courses of treatments. One course is considered ten to twelve acupuncture treatments or weeks of herbal therapy. Some people will notice improvement after a single treatment. Others take longer to respond as acupuncture requires a cumulative effect. The rule of thumb is that for acute problems you may only need a few treatments such as 2-3 times per week and for chronic problems you may need a few months of treatments with 1-2 times treatment per week. In general if you do not notice some results after having five to seven treatments, a different approach should be considered or further diagnosis needs to be performed to identify the root cause.

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Herbs can be a powerful adjunct to acupuncture treatment. They are used to strengthen, build and support the body. Herbal prescription may be recommended along with acupuncture treatment to build up your internal strength so you can receive the full benefits that acupuncture offers.
 
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Herbal therapy is an effective option for those who are unable to come regularly or will miss consistent acupuncture treatments due to various reasons. Combining the modalities of herbs and acupuncture creates a synergist treatment pair, each increasing the power of the other. Herbal therapy can fill in for the interval between acupuncture treatments to support the body for those who miss few acupuncture treatments.
 
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